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Sunday, June 23, 2013

GOD KNEW ME FROM THE START... HE STILL KNOWS ME.

THIS IS AN OLD PICTURE OF MY FAMILY.
On the left kneeling down in the white dress is my late biological mother whose name was Jane. Standing on her right-side is me[ Nakidde Brenda Lillian AKA Brendah Jermaine Hansen] at the time I was two years old. The baby I was resting my arm on, is my baby brother [Mwanje Nicholas AKA Nicholas Hansen]. The lady who is holding him is my mother's auntie I don't remember her name and the girl kneeling next to her is my older sister from my mother's side her name is Nakintu Barbara. Then next to her is my uncle in a dark brown shirt kneeling down as well and his name is Sseruwajji Kasimu. Even from being a young girl, I realize now that God for sure knew me and he still is with me.


Monday, January 14, 2013

The Chosen One

Saved from her family’s sorrow
By Brendah Hansen
Guest Writer
    Aids has affected me because my parents, friends, and relatives suffered from it, and it led to their deaths. Yet I remember when I was in the village; we lived in a small three room house with many children.
    I lived with my two aunts, Namusisi and Nanono. Aunt Namusisi took care of the kids and looked after aunt Nanono, too, because she had AIDS. She was my father’s sister.
    The kids took turns looking after aunt Nanono when aunt Namusisi wasn’t around. My job was to feed her food and drinks. That didn’t give me enough time to play with my friends and enjoy myself as a kid, but I didn’t mind because I loved her so much.    There were times when my aunt Nanono couldn’t even walk or help herself to the bathroom, but when she made some improvement, she managed to move from one place to another. She would use her elbows to pull her entire body. It was difficult to watch her skin peel off her elbows every time she used them to move around the house. She was so skinny and her eyeballs grew bigger, which scared me to death. Every time I served her a drink, I had to lift her head and then put the straw between her lips.
    There were times when the other kids and I had to carry her outside so that she could feel the fresh air and get some vitamin D from the morning sunshine.  The other main reason is so that we could clean her beddings and save her from the mess. AIDS  was the cause of my aunt Nanono’s pain, struggle, and suffering, yet she knew there was nothing anyone could do to heal her, save her or rescue her from that killer disease.
    Night came so quickly. It was a Wednesday. We all sat down for dinner in the living room, for on the other side of the room my aunt Nanono was laying on her small mattress. She started to breathe so heavily. She breathed as if she had asthma. Then my aunt Namusisi started to tell a story about how aunt Nanono’s mother died. It all happened in that same night, “Aunt Nanono’s mum had those same heavy breaths, and it was Wednesday night the night of Thursday morning, and that was when aunt Nanono’s mom died,” said aunt Namusisi. She said that because she knew aunt Nanono could die at any moment.
    I truly thought she had made up that whole story, but it was real because my aunt Nanono died the same day, and the same time. It was painful for me for a few years because I missed her so much, and I still do. I thought she should have died because she had suffered enough. AIDS invaded my family’s life. I went to a burial ceremony for my aunt Nanono. At the ceremony, I got this unforgettable flashback of how aunt Nanono struggled and cried from the excruciating pain.
    She was one of the sweetest aunts the world could ever imagine. As a result of AIDS, the biggest monster on earth, chewed on my aunt Nanono and swallowed her slowly and brutally little by little and day by day. AIDS changed her beauty; a women who had a healthy body was left a skeleton with long hair that started falling off. Instead of the glowing woman I once knew, it made her look like a vampire, for vampires never smile. She hated her own life and everything in this world.
    At a time I thought God had something against me. I realized how wrong I was, because God loved and cared for me. That’s why I didn’t have AIDS. In my entire family, I was surrounded by so many people with AIDS. That showed me that I am a survivor who was saved and rescued from the never-ending world war. I am willing to help people with AIDS and make them feel loved.

Saturday, November 19, 2011

Saved from her family’s sorrow


Saved from her family’s sorrow
By Brendah Hansen
Guest Writer
 
    Aids has affected me because my parents, friends, and relatives suffered from it, and it led to their deaths. Yet I remember when I was in the village; we lived in a small three room house with many children.
    I lived with my two aunts, Namusisi and Nanono. Aunt Namusisi took care of the kids and looked after aunt Nanono, too, because she had AIDS. She was my father’s sister.
    The kids took turns looking after aunt Nanono when aunt Namusisi wasn’t around. My job was to feed her food and drinks. That didn’t give me enough time to play with my friends and enjoy myself as a kid, but I didn’t mind because I loved her so much.    There were times when my aunt Nanono couldn’t even walk or help herself to the bathroom, but when she made some improvement, she managed to move from one place to another. She would use her elbows to pull her entire body. It was difficult to watch her skin peel off her elbows every time she used them to move around the house. She was so skinny and her eyeballs grew bigger, which scared me to death. Every time I served her a drink, I had to lift her head and then put the straw between her lips.
    There were times when the other kids and I had to carry her outside so that she could feel the fresh air and get some vitamin D from the morning sunshine.  The other main reason is so that we could clean herbeddings and save her from the mess. AIDS  was the cause of my aunt Nanono’s pain, struggle, and suffering, yet she knew there was nothing anyone could do to heal her, save her or rescue her from that killer disease.
    Night came so quickly. It was a Wednesday. We all sat down for dinner in the living room, for on the other side of the room my aunt Nanono was laying on her small mattress. She started to breathe so heavily. She breathed as if she had asthma. Then my aunt Namusisi started to tell a story about how aunt Nanono’s mother died. It all happened in that same night, “Aunt Nanono’s mum had those same heavy breaths, and it was Wednesday night the night of Thursday morning, and that was when aunt Nanono’s mom died,” said aunt Namusisi. She said that because she knew aunt Nanono could die at any moment.
    I truly thought she had made up that whole story, but it was real because my aunt Nanono died the same day, and the same time. It was painful for me for a few years because I missed her so much, and I still do. I thought she should have died because she had suffered enough. AIDS invaded my family’s life. I went to a burial ceremony for my aunt Nanono. At the ceremony, I got this unforgettable flashback of how aunt Nanono struggled and cried from the excruciating pain.
    She was one of the sweetest aunts the world could ever imagine. As a result of AIDS, the biggest monster on earth, chewed on my aunt Nanono and swallowed her slowly and brutally little by little and day by day. AIDS changed her beauty; a women who had a healthy body was left a skeleton with long hair that started falling off. Instead of the glowing woman I once knew, it made her look like a vampire, for vampires never smile. She hated her own life and everything in this world.
    At a time I thought God had something against me. I realized how wrong I was, because God loved and cared for me. That’s why I didn’t have AIDS. In my entire family, I was surrounded by so many people with AIDS. That showed me that I am a survivor who was saved and rescued from the never-ending world war. I am willing to help people with AIDS and make them feel loved.

Saturday, September 3, 2011

Every one of these fa-nominal kids got history behind their actions"and I was and still am one of them".



Ugandan children bring songs of hope, faith to local churches
Phiona Nekesa’s story is typical of children in the Mwamba Uganda Children’s Choir. Her mother died of AIDS. “I have only my dad,” said Phiona, 14, who lives in an orphanage in Kampala, Uganda. “My young brother died. We were six but now we are four.”
The tragedies of Phiona’s life don’t show as she sings joyous, high-energy Christian songs with the 16 other children in the choir. “I like being in this choir,” she said. “I serve God in this choir.”
The children, whose ages range from 6 to 14, are scheduled to sing in several local churches in coming weeks, and are open to invitations from other congregations. Money raised through donations and sales of the choir’s CD will help support the IAM Children’s Family orphanage in Uganda, where some of the children live.
During their shows, one lively song admonishes, “Keep on dreaming/You can have your dreams/Don’t ever let you dreams die.”
Other songs are in Luganda, one of the languages spoken in Uganda, and other African languages. A song about conquering the devil has a familiar refrain, “Yahweh,” which means the same as it does in a church here.
Jemimah Nasanga, the choir’s director, alternates between English and Luganda as she drills the children in proper breathing and the precise dance moves. “If you don’t exaggerate your hands, nobody is going to see you!” she tells the children. “Learn to bend you knees!”
One dance seems like a tap dance in flip-flops. (For concerts, the children don traditional Ugandan clothes and slippers.)
The choir’s appearance here is the result of a labor of love by Laura Carter of Kalama.
Carter, who previously worked on the staffs of state Sen. Don Benton, and Linda Smith (still active politicians?) when she was a state legislator, first visited the orphanage during a 2003 trip to Uganda. With five return trips to the African country, Carter has become the U.S. director of administration for the orphanage, which she described as a full-time volunteer job.
About 30 children live in the orphanage, though others are helped by its programs. “We reach out to about 170 children,” Carter said.
“I just fell in love with them,” Carter said. They’re like my own children.”
One emphasis at the orphanage is medical care. “They don’t go to the doctor until they’re next to their death beds because they can’t afford it.”
Like Phiona, many children are at the orphanage after losing a parent or parents to AIDS. According to Uganda’s official Web site, about 6 percent of people in the population there have AIDS, and about 880,000 Ugandan children have been orphaned because of the condition.
Many of the children served live in poverty, Carter said. “Most of the homes they live in are about the size of a bathroom with no electricity or running water.”
Getting the children to the United States was “a huge, huge undertaking,” Carter said, between arranging for passports and securing permission from parents or guardians to leave Uganda.
The children left Uganda July 21 and toured Denmark before arriving here on Sept. 1. After their last concert in the Lower Columbia area they’ll go to Arizona in November before returning home in December.
It’s a long time away from home and family for the children, but Carter said homesickness isn’t a problem. “Every person’s dream in Uganda is to come to America,” she said.
Rather than spread the children out among volunteers’ houses, Carter and her relatives decided to house them all on their property in the hills above Kalama. Carter created a dormitory for the boys and three adult males in their band on the main floor of her log cabin-style house. The girls took over the family room of the house of Carter’s son and daughter-in-law, Terry and Crystal Shepherd, which is next door.
The families brought in a couple of port a-potties to avoid lines for the bathrooms, and posted labels (“screen door”, “rail”) around the houses to help teach English. The Mayger-Downing Community Church, which Carter attends, loaned a bus to get everyone to the concerts.
The kids alternate between English lessons and rehearsals in the Shepherds’ triple garage.
After rehearsals this week, the group filed into Shepherd house, where Crystal had been busy steaming rice, cooking peanut sauce and slicing watermelon. Shelves of her garage are stuffed with plastic buckets of rice and beans to feed the flock, with help from other volunteers.
Nutrition is a major concern for some of the children.
One of the girls, Brenda Nakidde, “was starving to death when she came to the orphanage,” Carter said. Both of her parents died of AIDS.
“The most fun thing is to dance,” Brenda said of being in the choir. Her future goal: “I want to be an engineer — and to be a footballer.”
Gloria Tendo, 10, who sings a solo on one song, lives with her parents but is helped by the orphanage. “They don’t have money,” Gloria said.
In between rehearsals and lessons, there’s time for some fun. The Carters set up a trampoline and gathered bicycles and scooters. They aren’t allowed to watch TV.
They took the children to a picnic at Merwin Park on a sunny afternoon. “They can’t swim,” Carter said, which made the Merwin trip challenging for the leaders. Other excursions are planned to the Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport and to Bonneville Dam.
People who sponsor individual children take them on outings.
But the high points of the journey for children and audiences are the uplifting song-and-dance shows.
“It really catches people’s hearts,” Carter said. “They come from such difficult circumstances but they’re so full of joy.”


Read more: http://tdn.com/lifestyles/article_ae9e5f9f-98a1-549b-9424-1d87a0cf8283.html#ixzz1WxFZzgHA

Thursday, September 1, 2011

WALKS ON THE MOUNTAIN.


Last time I visited the mountain, "mount hood" I spent a night at somebody's house,it was the beautiful place ever.I went on most of the rides at mount hood. I took a walk down in the Forrest towards the river.I stopped for a while and thought about God how mighty and holly he was. I watched the water  running down the stream and then I heard God's voice telling me to look a round by the way I was alone,but when I did look a round, I immediately saw the two dead trees fall over the river and both trees made an "X" sign. The first tree was a medium size kind of a tree Fall down over from where I stood to the other side of the river, then the second small size tree fall over the first one on the opposite sides.God said to me well, "what do you think?"I ran from the side I was standing on to the opposite side then I started walking on above the river on those dead trees from one side to the other,but all I can tell you is that I felt the glory of God and his morning air fall on my forehead and on my face then he told me what the "X"sign meant "connections".However that's how people connect to other people from all over the planet and he also showed me that most of the time we use bridges,boats and other things whenever we want to cross the waters as in Seas,Oceans,Lakes and Rivers,but there is always a way to cross the waters besides the bridges and other things.That was my experience on the mountain or(at mount hood).

Saturday, August 27, 2011

MY DAD WAS MY "HERO"

My dad was a hero to me and his other families.He had ten kids to care for six of them are boys and four of them are girls and that includes me myself.We all shared the same dad,but different mom's.I had come to realize that my dad never got married to any of his "wives" and the reason behind that is that he didn't know whom to marry and they were also many and he loved them all.


I have never seen such a thing but a minute I saw my father in that kind of situation,I didn't know what else to think at a time.In the meantime he was a great dad and a loving one of his kids with little to provide them with and in all his kids I was my dad's little girl so I thought that made me special.


My dad was a hard worker who was admired by his workmates and his family.I used to watch him every morning getting up from bed prepare breakfast and lunch before he took off to work.The meals were just for two of us me and him b'cause we lived together.I couldn't live with my mom because she and her family were Muslims in that matter my dad was a protestant so that was the conflict in their relationship.Back to my dad he went to work from sunrise to sunset and he worked as a mechanic.


The reason why I called him my "HERO" is that he played two roles at the same time.He play the mom's role when I needed a mom and she wasn't there and his part of being a dad to me.So my dad was always there when i needed him. Every time he was at work,he thought of me and how I was doing at home so he came back and check on me very often,brought me snacks,and took me places so I thought that was a cool thing he did .


My dad was also an addict to Cigarette smoking and drinking because  all this,he had lung problems and later on in life he got HIV/AIDS,but before all this happened, my one and poor mother died in 1999.My dad couldn't continue his work any longer and he couldn't think right.He was all messed up come to think of his life ten children,three of them just lost their mother and that was hard on him.He started looking for a loving home where he could put his three kids. Luckily and thankfully he found one I can call "the home sweet home" I'AM CHILDREN'S FAMILY ORPHANAGE.


After putting us the children's home,he thanked the almighty God that we got a home where we could get some parental love and before he left us he told us to be on our best behaviors and to listen to the elders because they were in charge of us back then.I watched him saying goodbye to us with tears in his eye rolling down on the ground. I wished for a moment if there was some thing I can do something at all,but then I realized that there was nothing at all I could have done.


My beloved dad knew he was going to die that's why he tried to find a future for his young ones.He became an outcast in the society and everywhere he went people didn't like him because he had AIDS and that's common where I come from instead of sharing God's love to the dying souls ,they live them to die like animals so my poor dad died in 2005 when I was 11yrs of age.AIDS has torchered my family ever since I was 6yrs of age,but no matter where my relatives and parents are now heaven or hell they're still family to me and I miss them so much.